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NBA scout says RJ Barrett ‘is like a lefty version’ of Andrew Wiggins

Knicks, R.J. Barrett, Andrew Wiggins

An NBA scout says New York Knicks rookie RJ Barrett “is like a lefty version” of Minnesota Timberwolves small forward Andrew Wiggins.

This scout says Barrett has more passion for the game and is a better passer than Wiggins. The Knicks have tough veterans such as Julius Randle, Bobby Portis, Taj Gibson and Marcus Morris who won’t be afraid to get in Barrett’s face. That’s something this scout says might work in Barrett’s favor.

“I want to like the kid, but I have worries.” the scout told Keith Smith of Real GM. “Is he Wiggins 2.0? I think he’s got more fire than Wiggins, but he is like a lefty version of him for me somewhat. The best thing the Knicks did was bring in some vets who will kick his ass if he’s too cool. I will say he passes it better already than Wiggins ever has. Maybe he’s Evan Turner 2.0?”

RJ Barrett got off to a terrible start at Summer League, but played well in his final three games.

Barrett scored just 10 points on 22.2 percent shooting from the field in the Knicks’ Summer League opener against the New Orleans Pelicans. The lefty followed that up with an eight-point, 10-rebound game versus the Phoenix Suns. Barrett shot just 20.0 percent in that game and the media was already killing him. Both Andrew Wiggins and Barrett are volume scorers who aren’t efficient.

The next three Summer League games were good for Barrett, though. He put up 17 points, 10 rebounds and six assists while shooting 42.9 percent overall against the Toronto Raptors, posted 21 points and 10 rebounds versus the Los Angeles Lakers, and finished Summer League with 21 points, eight rebounds and 10 assists against the Washington Wizards.

Needless to say, the Knicks were relieved internally to see Barrett show some flashes of dominance.

At Duke, Barrett averaged 22.6 points, 7.6 rebounds and 4.3 assists while shooting 45.4 percent from the field, 30.8 percent from beyond the arc and 66.5 percent from the free-throw line.