Quantcast
Connect with us

NBA

Chris Broussard believes Lakers should bring in Anthony Davis, Jimmy Butler alongside LeBron James

LeBron James, Jimmy Butler, Anthony Davis

LeBron James needs help. He and the Los Angeles Lakers stressed all offseason that they wouldn’t rush the team’s trajectory toward championship contention, instead letting incumbent young players grow while assessing the market for available superstars come the summer of 2019. James’ groin injury on Christmas and the team’s subsequent struggles without him might have changed that thinking, but it was Anthony Davis’ trade request from the New Orleans Pelicans that affected it more than anything else – especially considering he reportedly intends to sign with the purple and gold as a free agent in 2020.

The trade deadline came and went without a deal between Los Angeles and New Orleans, though, leaving open the possibility Davis is dealt elsewhere – like to the asset-rich Boston Celtics – once the season is finished. Are the Lakers still the favorite to land the six-time All-Star? Perhaps.

Regardless, Magic Johnson and Rob Pelinka should keep their eye on other prospective free agents in hopes of vaulting their team to championship contention as soon as possible, before Father Time continues slowly chipping away at James’ game ay further.

Who should Los Angeles be targeting? Given the likelihood of other top-tier free agents spurning them, FOX Sports’ Chris Broussard believes Jimmy Butler would be a “heck” of a fit next to James and Davis:

There’s too much overlap between the games of James and Butler for their potential partnership to coalesce into something greater than the sum of their talents. Both players are best with the ball in their hands, running pick-and-rolls, posting up, and iso-ing on the perimeter against mismatches. But would bringing in Butler, especially if Davis is already on the roster, be worth it nonetheless if Kevin Durant, Kawhi Leonard, Kyrie Irving, and Klay Thompson sign elsewhere?

We don’t think so considering the accompanying on-court and salary-cap ramifications, but reasonable minds can disagree.