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NBA Players react to the All-Star game being moved from Charlotte

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The 2017 NBA All-Star game was supposed to be held in Time Warner Cable Arena in Charlotte, but the league decided to relocate its mid-season spectacle because of a piece of legislation.

An official announcement was made by the NBA yesterday in line with House Bill 2, also known as the Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act. According to a report by Tal Kopan and Eugene Scott of CNN, this law “bans individuals from using public bathrooms that do not correspond to their biological sex” and “reserves the right to pass nondiscrimination legislation to the state government, saying state laws pre-empt any local ordinances.”

Needless to say, it has been controversial since being signed by North Carolina’s Governor.

Players from past and present have chimed in on the matter, including reigning back-to-back MVP, Stephen Curry. A video tweeted by ESPN shows the Charlotte native discussing his disappointment for his beloved hometown missing out on hosting the event. He also said that he supports the league’s decision:

Another MVP, from 2014, Kevin Durant, used Twitter to voice out his thoughts on the matter. He acknowledged the tough decision the NBA made, and stressed being against discrimination:

The first openly gay professional athlete in the U.S. and former NBA player, Jason Collins, came out with this statement:

Paul George of the Indiana Pacers said, via ESPN.com’s Ramona Shelburne

“I’m huge on keeping your word. I’m not necessarily saying it’s bad for the NBA to move it. Charlotte is a growing city, and the Hornets have picked that program up. It’s a shame it’s possible that we’d take that away from them.”

She also spoke with Carmelo Anthony of the Knicks, who during the ESPYs spoke out against violence together with fellow superstars LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, and Chris Paul.

Chris Paul’s reaction:

Even NCAA coaches from North Carolina teams could not help but denounce the anti-LGBT bill. Mike Krzyzewski told USA TODAY’s Scott Gleeson and Jeff Zillgitt, “It’s an embarrassing bill. That’s all I’m going to say about it.” North Carolina State head coach Mark Gottfried elaborated:

“I’m against any law that allows discrimination, whether that’s based on race, gender, sexual orientation, I don’t understand how someone can support this. I think the people at N.C. State, we believe in inclusion. Being a resident of the state, for me and my family, it’s been frustrating.”

As controversial as it has been, the bill was signed in late March and it passed through the state House by an 82-26 vote, much to the surprise of people who thought this act would not be supported by many.

The NBA is now looking into having the city of New Orleans to host the All-Star weekend next year.

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